Tuesday, 11 June 2024 00:00

Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, poses significant challenges for foot health, stemming from restricted blood flow to the lower extremities. This condition, often caused by atherosclerosis, involves the buildup of fatty deposits in the arteries, leading to narrowed or blocked blood vessels. The diminished blood supply to the feet can result in various symptoms, including pain, cramping, numbness, and weakness, particularly during physical activity. Left untreated, PAD can contribute to serious complications such as foot ulcers, infections, and delayed wound healing. Diagnosing PAD typically involves a comprehensive evaluation by a podiatrist. This process includes a thorough medical history review, assessment of risk factors such as smoking and diabetes, and a physical examination focused on evaluating circulation in the legs and feet. Specialized diagnostic tests, such as ankle-brachial index, or ABI measurement, Doppler ultrasound, and angiography, may also be employed to confirm the diagnosis and determine the extent of arterial blockages. If you are experiencing any of the foot symptoms mentioned above, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can accurately diagnose and offer relief solutions for PAD.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Donovan Gowdie, DPM from The Foot & Ankle Treatment Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Watkinsville, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 05 June 2024 00:00

Have you noticed discoloration of your toenails? Have they become thickened or brittle? If so, you may be experiencing symptoms of a fungal nail infection. For some, having a fungal nail can be embarrassing. Overcome your embarrassment, and get treated.

Tuesday, 04 June 2024 00:00

In the fast-paced world of healthcare, where every second counts and every step matters, the importance of wearing the right shoes cannot be overstated. Medical professionals spend long hours on their feet, navigating through demanding tasks and unpredictable situations. The right footwear provides the necessary support, stability, and comfort to endure the rigors of the medical workplace without compromising on performance or well-being. Wearing ill-fitting or unsuitable shoes can lead to a myriad of issues, from foot pain and discomfort to chronic conditions, such as plantar fasciitis. Additionally, proper footwear plays a critical role in maintaining hygiene standards, reducing the risk of slips, trips, and falls, and preventing the transmission of contaminants. For these reasons, it is beneficial to Invest in high-quality, supportive shoes that are tailored to the specific demands of the medical environment. Working in the medical field may cause mild or chronic foot pain as a result of standing and walking for several hours. If you have developed a foot condition, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can offer appropriate treatment solutions, in addition to guiding you in selecting proper footwear.

While working on the feet, it is important to take the proper care of them. For more information about working on your feet, contact Donovan Gowdie, DPM from The Foot & Ankle Treatment Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Working on Your Feet

Standing on your feet for long periods of time can cause stress and pain in your feet. Your whole body may experience change in terms of posture, back pain, bunions, callouses and or plantar warts. There are ways to avoid these conditions with proper foot care, smart choices and correct posture.

Positive Changes

Negative heeled shoe – Choosing this shoe type places the heel slightly lower than the ball of the foot. These are great for overall foot health. Find shoes that fit you correctly.

Go barefoot – Our feet were not designed to be enclosed for all hours of the day. Try to periodically expose your feet to air.

Eliminate Pain

Foot Exercises – Performing simple exercises, incorporating yoga and doing stretches are beneficial. This will allow increased blood flow to the area and muscles of the foot.

Achilles tendon – Stretching the foot out flat on the floor will relax the calf muscles and tendon. These exercises can be performed almost anywhere. Make sure you add these exercises to your daily regimen. 

With a little bit of this information and knowing more about foot health, you will notice changes. Foot stretches and proper footwear will help with pain and prevent further issues.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Watkinsville, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 28 May 2024 00:00

Corns are hard, thickened areas of skin that form on the feet in response to pressure and friction. They typically develop on the toes or the soles of the feet. These skin lesions can cause discomfort and pain, particularly when pressure is applied, such as while wearing shoes. Although corns form to protect the skin, they often grow too thick and need to be managed. A podiatrist, or foot doctor, can professionally remove corns through several methods. One common technique is carefully paring down the thickened skin using a scalpel. This should only be done by a professional to avoid injury. For persistent corns, a podiatrist may also use salicylic acid treatments to chemically pare down the excess skin. Additionally, custom orthotics or padding might be recommended to relieve pressure and prevent the recurrence of corns. In severe cases, a podiatrist may suggest surgical correction of the underlying bone structure that causes the friction. If you are struggling with foot corns, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist for personalized and safe treatment. 

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Donovan Gowdie, DPM of The Foot & Ankle Treatment Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Watkinsville, GA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns: What Are They, and How Do You Get Rid of Them
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